The Incense Road Header

 

Documentary Film based on Gibson's book: Qur'anic Geography
 

 

The Sacred City from Glasshouse Media on Vimeo.

   Stops on the
Incense Road
 
Gaza(Jenysos)
Elusa
Ruheiba
Obodat
Wadi Fiqreh
Wadi Arabah
Sela
Rekem, (Petra)
Ayl
Gryn
Hawara
Wadi Rumm
Al Uyaynah
Northern Desert Trek
Tayma
Meda'in Saleh
Dedan
Khaybar
Medina
Southern Desert Trek
Najran
Sa'ada
Yathul
Marib (Saba)
Timna (Qatraban)
Shibam(Hadramaut)
Ubar
 
Further Information
Camels
The Incense Sea Route
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

Wadi Rumm

The picture above was taken by Greg Fisher, (Humeima Exp.98,02).
A Nabataean settlement was discovered in Wadi Rumm by G. Horsfield and excavated by himself in the early 1930s. Later in May 1959 D. Kirkbride conducted another excavation. In 1962 the Department of Antiquities began a large-scale clearing operation, exposing more than 2800 square meters of antiquities. However, an earthquake in 1995 caused the area severe damage. The ruins in Wadi Rumm include a temple, several villas, and building complexes. 
Within the construction materials of the Nabataean temple was a stone that was reused from a previous structure. This stone contained a Thamudic inscription referring to the construction of a sanctuary for Lat. The main Nabataean temple was erected around the first century BC. A Latin inscription was attached to an alter, indicating that the temple was in use in the first half of the third century.
 
Inscriptions around the temple and at the springs were left by various workmen, masons, sculptors and architects.
Wadi Rumm (Iram) is first mentioned by Cl. Ptolemaeus in his list of cities in Arabia Felix. (Aramava-Geogr., 6.7.27). Above the site, on Rumm Mountain are several natural springs. From these springs Nabataean aqueducts carried water down to two cisterns. A second canal system came from Ayn Abu Rumayleh, down through the temple hillside to the eastern complex and its baths.