Documentary Film based on Gibson's book: Qur'anic Geography
 

 

The Sacred City from Glasshouse Media on Vimeo.

 Ports and Stops on the
Maritime Incense Route
 
Sumhuram
Cane
Aden
Muza
Berinece
Philotera
Myos Hormos
Leuce Kome
Alia
Hawara
Gryn
Ayl
Rekem, (Petra)
Sela
Wadi Arabah
Wadi Fiqreh
Obodat
Ruheiba
Elusa
Gaza (Jenysos)
Alexandria

Further Information
Who were the ancient Arab Sea Traders?
Southern Arabia
Ancient Sailing and Navigation
History & Construction of the Dhow
Camels
Parallel Maritime Histories
The Incense Road

Berenice

Around 275 BC, Ptolemy II (Philadelphos), king of Egypt, founded a port on the Red Sea coast. He named it after his mother, Berenike I. This port was originally created to aid in the importation of elephants for Ptolemy's army. Berenike is a natural harbor, protected against the prevailing northern winds by a large peninsula. (See photo on the right). As the Nabataeans were known to prey on Red Sea shipping, it was desirable to have a safe port as far to the south as possible. From Berenike there were overland routes through the Eastern desert to the Nile valley. These routes were protected by caravansaries that provided the caravans with water and shelter.
Berenike Peninsula
Please visit Egypt Voyager.com
When the Nabataeans began to export incense via the maritime route on the Red Sea, Berenike developed into a trade emporium. Some of the cargoes included: spices, myrrh, frankincense, pearls and textiles. These were all shipped via Berenike to Alexandria and Rome.

Until 1994 little was known about the port of Berenike. It was even unclear when the port had been abandoned. However, in 1994, Steven E. Sidebotham, a professor of ancient history at the University of Delaware began an excavation of the site. You can read his report by following the link below.

http://www.archbase.com/index.html
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